In recent years egg freezing methodologies have changed. Prior to vitrification, a slow freezing method was used for egg freezing and it frequently resulted in formation of small ice crystals damaging the egg cell, as the cells are mostly water. Nowadays oocyte vitrification has significantly advanced the outcome of oocyte cryopreservation. This improvement has led to results comparable to those achieved in IVF using fresh egg cells. Various studies have confirmed this.

This possibility has opened a new door for women, but at the same time this situation has led to new debate, both in the professional community and in society at large, about the acceptability of offering this technology to reproductively healthy women who want to freeze their eggs to beat the biological clock.

Women put off becoming mothers because they’re focused on their careers, working toward advanced degrees, travelling the world, or just in a search for the right partner. With egg freezing and new technologies there is more time to change jobs, careers, and partners. The option of egg freezing may in fact give them more breathing space, but what about ethical and moral aspects?! There are far too many demands in women’s life calling for simultaneous realization, and many women who want to have children feel considerable pressure to be successful and balance being mothers, career woman and wives at the same time.

The arguments against cryopreservation are not convincing. On the other hand, it seems that we have accepted that egg freezing is an absolute way of becoming a parent, and it is not. It is extremely important to be well informed in order to avoid raising false hopes. While IVF and egg freezing are indeed increasing our chances of becoming a parent later in life, we are still talking about chances not certainty, and we should always have that in mind.

The message must remain that women’s best chances of having a healthy child are through natural reproduction at a relative early age.

If you wish to read further visit http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22357771