Most people nowadays lead a sedentary lifestyle. Even without numerous studies we are able to see that obesity become common, and that we should be more physically active. Did you know that obesity is related to depression? Should we fight it, or treat it with medications? It surely depends on how severe and serious our condition is. There is a huge difference between a woman who is suicidal, who in all likelihood should remain on medication, versus women with mild or moderate depression symptoms who would benefit from a different approach, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, or physical exercise. Of course if you’re using already using antidepressants you might want to have a discussion with you doctor about individual risk to benefit ratio. Suddenly stopping most likely is not the best idea.

Recently a study has been conducted with the purpose of examining the association between mental health status, such as depression, and objectively measured physical activity in obese pregnant women from several European countries. Almost 100 pregnant women participated in the study with their BMI (body mass index) between 30-38.

Findings suggest that in pregnant women who are obese, a depressed mood, may be associated with less physical activity. The combined risk of poor mental health and low physical activity levels makes women vulnerable for pregnancy complications. The question remains whether a depressed mood may be a barrier for improving physical activity. Depressed mothers are more likely to neglect diet, abuse drugs and alcohol, and there is increased risk of hurting themselves or the unborn child. Also during pregnancy baby is exposed to stress hormones increasing chances of depression later in life.

Though obesity is not the reason behind depression, once we treat it we will improve our chances of getting pregnant and having a healthy child. Healthy diet combined with physical exercise, as well as and bringing your BMI to level recommended for your age might be the best things you can do for yourself and your baby.

If you wish to read further visit http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26228253